AIA | National

On February 23, 1857, 13 architects met in Richard Upjohn’s office to form what would become the American Institute of Architects (AIA). The group sought to create an architecture organization that would “promote the scientific and practical perfection of its members” and “elevate the standing of the profession.” AIA | National sought “progressive men who are capable of influencing public opinion in their communities, and who are willing to take an active interest in organization affairs.” AIA Chapters were formed throughout the United States as the field of architecture grew.

Today, AIA | National boasts over 90,000 members from over 260 chapter around the world. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., AIA | National is located one block from the White House and within easy walking distance of our nation’s Capitol, making advocacy efforts on Capitol Hill much more agile.

AIA | National is comprised of components across the world and Mississippi’s is located, similarly, one block from the Mississippi Governor’s Mansion and within easy walking distance of the Mississippi State Capitol Building. During the annual legislative session, our members and leaders actively monitor and influence policy in the state, assuring architects that their voice is heard and considered when important decisions are being made that impact the profession.

Values

AIA advocates for the value of architecture and gives architects the resources they need to do their best work. Our work drives positive change through the power of design and focuses on the following themes: equity, diversity and inclusion; climate change; immigration; infrastructure; licensure and sustainability. Read more about where architects stand and a statement of their values.

Standards

The AIA has a long history of requiring that its members adhere to the highest ethics and standards:

  • Antitrust compliance
    AIA and its members are committed to the highest ethical standards and full compliance with all laws and regulations, including federal and state antitrust laws. By complying with both the letter and spirit of antitrust laws, we protect the integrity of our professions and the reputation of the AIA.
  • Attribution of credit
    One of the most common violations handled by the NEC relates to the attribution of credit. The NEC’s Guidelines for the Attribution of Credit can help parties decide on and structure attribution.
  • Bylaws
    The AIA Bylaws outline AIA’s day-to-day rules and procedures and provide comprehensive guidelines and outline responsibilities for members, groups, and other entities within the Institute.
  • Code of Ethics
    Ethics and integrity are essential to our work. AIA members are dedicated to the highest standards of professionalism, integrity and competence. The AIA Code of Ethics guides members’ conduct in fulfilling those obligations. The Code applies to the professional activities of all AIA members, regardless of their membership category.
  • Using the AIA designation
    One of the benefits that comes with membership in the Institute is the right to use a suffix to the member’s name that includes the AIA’s initials. AIA’s Bylaws designate a particular suffix that may be used by each membership category except for allied members, who are not permitted to use the AIA’s initials as a suffix to their names.

Read more about the American Institute of Architects at their website.

AIA TrustWhere Smart Architects Manage Risk. The AIA Trust is a free risk management resource, offering benefit programs and practice resources for AIA Members.